February 3, 2020

A Wellspring of Life

Jesus was passionate about living unselfishly, leaving an example for us all.

Ellen G. White

But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life. John 4:14, KJV.


Many are suffering from maladies of the soul far more than from diseases of the body, and they will find no relief until they come to Christ, the wellspring of life. . . . Christ is the mighty Healer of the sin-sick soul (Counsels on Health, p. 502).

If we let go of Jesus we have nothing to hold on to. . . . Perpetual grace in ever-flowing streams is blessing those who will, if athirst, come unto Him and drink (letter 2, 1889).

He who seeks to quench his thirst at the fountains of this world will drink only to thirst again. Everywhere [men and women] are unsatisfied. They long for something to supply the need of the soul. Only One can meet that want. The need of the world, “the desire of all nations,” is Christ. The divine grace which He alone can impart is as living water, purifying, refreshing, and invigorating the soul. . . .

He who tastes of the love of Christ will continually long for more; but he seeks for nothing else. The riches, honors, and pleasures of the world do not attract him. The constant cry of his heart is, More of Thee. And He who reveals to the soul its necessity is waiting to satisfy its hunger and thirst. Every human resource and dependence will fail. The cisterns will be emptied, the pools become dry; but our Redeemer is an inexhaustible fountain.

Life is mysterious and sacred. It is the manifestation of God Himself, the source of all life.

We may drink, and drink again, and ever find a fresh supply. He in whom Christ dwells has within himself the fountain of blessing—“a well of water springing up into everlasting life.” From this source he may draw strength and grace sufficient for all his needs (The Desire of Ages, p. 187).

He who drinks of the living water becomes a fountain of life. The receiver becomes a giver. The grace of Christ in the soul is like a spring in the desert, welling up to refresh all, and making those who are ready to perish eager to drink of the water of life (The Desire of Ages, p. 195).

Source of All Life

For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light. Ps. 36:9, KJV.

All created beings live by the will and power of God. They are dependent recipients of the life of God. From the highest seraph to the humblest animate being, all are replenished from the Source of life (The Desire of Ages, p. 785).

The youth need to understand the deep truth underlying the Bible statement that with God “is the fountain of life.” Not only is He the originator of all, but He is the life of everything that lives. It is His life that we receive in the sunshine, in the pure, sweet air, in the food which builds up our bodies and sustains our strength. It is by His life that we exist, hour by hour, moment by moment. Except as perverted by sin, all His gifts tend to life, to health and joy (Education, pp. 197, 198). . . .

The same power that upholds nature, is working also in man. . . . The laws that govern the heart’s action, regulating the flow of the current of life to the body, are the laws of the mighty Intelligence that has the jurisdiction of the soul. From Him all life proceeds.

Only in harmony with Him can be found its true sphere of action. For all the objects of His creation the condition is the same—a life sustained by receiving the life of God, a life exercised in harmony with the Creator’s will. To transgress His law, physical, mental, or moral, is to place one’s self out of harmony with the universe (Education, pp. 99, 100). . . .

One Lease of Life

Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say, I have no pleasure in them. Eccl. 12:1, KJV.

Life is mysterious and sacred. It is the manifestation of God Himself, the source of all life. Precious are its opportunities, and earnestly should they be improved. Once lost, they are gone forever.

Before us God places eternity, with its solemn realities, and gives us a grasp on immortal, imperishable themes. He presents valuable, ennobling truth, that we may advance in a safe and sure path, in pursuit of an object worthy of the earnest engagement of all our capabilities. . . .

He desires that we shall constantly be growing in holiness, in happiness, in usefulness. All have capabilities which they must be taught to regard as sacred endowments, to appreciate as the Lord’s gifts, and rightly to employ. He desires the youth to cultivate every power of their being, and to bring every faculty into active exercise. He desires them to enjoy all that is useful and precious in this life, to be good and to do good, laying up a heavenly treasure for the future life.

It should be their ambition to excel in all things that are unselfish, high, and noble. Let them look to Christ as the pattern after which they are to be fashioned. The holy ambition that He revealed in His life they are to cherish—an ambition to make the world better for their having lived in it. This is the work to which they are called (The Ministry of Healing, pp. 397, 398).

Only one lease of life is granted us; and the inquiry with everyone should be, How can I invest my life so that it will yield the greatest profit? How can I do most for the glory of God and the benefit of [humanity]? (Temperance, p. 137).


Seventh-day Adventists believe that Ellen G. White (1827-1915) exercised the biblical gift of prophecy during more than 70 years of public ministry. These passages were excerpted from The Faith I Live By (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Pub. Assn., 1958), pp. 99, 164, 167.

Ellen G. White
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